Maria Jackson's picture
By Maria Jackson

Happy Hunger Games! Vol. 1, Issue 5

Welcome back, Tributes!

Want one of those new Catching Fire Posters? Click over to Amazon A.S.A.P! They have studio issued posters on sale for $14.50. These are large double-sided posters sure to be a collector’s item. As of this blog’s published date, there are only 8 posters left! {hunger-games.net}

Missed JLaw on SNL? Don’t worry, here’s a few skits!
Also, don’t forget to tune into Jimmy Kimmel on 1/31 11:35pm {a week from today} for more JLaw!

The Hunger Games Post-Game Press Conference

JL SNL THG Skit by simonaka

JL SNL RAPPING SKIT by simonaka

JL SNL Waitress Skit by simonaka

JL SNL Dog Chef Skit by simonaka

JL SNL Civil War Skit by simonaka


Major thanks to {simonaka} & {hunger-games.net}

Switching horses in the middle of the race can make you nervous and Francis Lawrence, director for Catching Fire & Mockingjay isn’t Gary Ross. There has been a lot of fan anxiety around this change and Lawrence addresses this and talks the films with MTV.  Visit MTV and MTV Hollywood Crush to read the full interviews.


“I liked what Gary did a lot, but I have a different style than he does,” Lawrence explained. “So it was very easy for me to come in the room and sit down with the people involved in the movie and sort of say, ‘Here’s what I like about what Gary did that I would latch on to and hold onto and embrace, and here’s the way I would do it differently.’ The trickier thing, honestly for me, was sort of stepping into a world, and there’s crew members that were on the first movie, obviously an entire cast, all the people that are returning that I inherited. I was nervous about what they were going to feel… I think everybody in general was really gracious and worked really hard and ended up being really fun to work with. I think there were a couple of people that were really bummed that Gary wasn’t doing it, and it had less to do with the choice of me coming on than just Gary not doing it. They signed on with Gary; they’re friends with Gary; they like Gary. And I think there was definitely some sadness there.”

Lawrence goes on to explain why he chose Sam Claflin to play the hunky Finnick Odair:
“[Claflin] is very athletic, which is great. He’s in great shape. He’s very charismatic,” Lawrence said. “But I was also looking in the long term. There’s kind of a rouge-like quality to him in this book. And long term, he’s actually an emotional character and a very loyal character and a character who’s in love; a character who experienced quite a lot of sadness. And he was really able to tap into that, as well as being really charming and sexy and handsome as hell.”

For those concerned about how many changes there will be when the book is adapted to film Lawrence eases our fears:
“No, not really, I would say that it’s a really faithful adaptation. You know, whenever you’re adapting something that’s a 12- or 14-hour read down to something that has to be around two hours, there’s going to be some cuts. We definitely made some cuts. I don’t want to go into that, but we did it with Suzanne, and I would say that it’s very, very faithful. We tried to get as much as we could in there.”

Lawrence also told MTV about one of his favorite scenes to shoot with Jennifer Lawrence and Liam Hemsworth.
“You know one of the very first things we shot that I like quite a lot is, there is sort of a goodbye before she goes into the arena with Liam that I like a lot. And it was actually—we shot it because we needed summer foliage and summer flowers and things like that. We actually shot it while we were in prep. Very first thing we sort of went out into the meadow, out in the mountains in north Georgia and shot this sequence over three or four hours or so, and I really like it. I think it’s really nice. Jennifer and Liam are really good in it. It’s very nice.”

On the scenes he’s most proud of:
“It’s interesting because there’s a very small blur—I want to say it’s a paragraph long in the book—but the moment in the arena when the gamemaker starts to spin the cornucopia, and I’m very proud of that. We designed a very cool sequence and created a spinning island, and that’s going to be very, very cool. So that’s kind of fun and very unique. I’ve never seen anything like it. It’s cool.
“You know one of the very first things we shot that I like quite a lot is, there is sort of a goodbye before she goes into the arena with Liam that I like a lot. And it was actually—we shot it because we needed summer foliage and summer flowers and things like that. We actually shot it while we were in prep. Very first thing we sort of went out into the meadow, out in the mountains in north Georgia and shot this sequence over three or four hours or so, and I really like it. I think it’s really nice. Jennifer and Liam are really good in it. It’s very nice.”

On whether his actors’ jovial natures ever lead to disruptions:
“You know what? I believe that the process could be fun, I just think that making movies is really tough. And it’s stressful as it is, and I think that most of us got in this business because it’s fun to make movies. I think it should stay fun. And it’s a really fun group and a very talented group. I would say only occasionally, maybe once or twice, did it get a little rowdy on set. We had to sort of clear everybody out because it is a little distracting. Or you just nicely say, ‘Hey guys, why don’t we take this off the set and go somewhere else?’ And I will say you go with that combo of Jen and Josh and Woody together and it can be mayhem.”

Wondering about if Lawrence has started any work on Mockingjay? Well, yes he has!
“Nina, John, Suzanne and I have gone through the book and created the beat sheets for it. And started going through all that and at least marking our initial ideas of what the moments would be and how it all breaks down. And Danny Strong, who’s writing the first one, is working now. So yeah, we’ve actually done a fair amount of work. We’re starting to think about where we could shoot it and all of that.”
{CatchingFireMovie}

Of course there’s no way I’m going to miss Catching Fire & Mockingjay. How’re you feeling after reading this interview? More anxious? Less anxious? Feeling confident in Lawrence or did you have a different director in mind? Let us know in the comments below!


Sam Claflin was interviewed by Norwich’s Future Radio’s The Future Radio Film Review Show. He gabbed about The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, Suzanne Collin’s incredible talent, filming in Hawaii, and being Finnick Odair.

FR: Firstly, I’m a huge fan of The Hunger Games ’cause I read all the books. Had you read the books, before you got the part?
SC: Before I got the part? No, no. Funnily enough, when I first went to see the first The Hunger Games, the original, I had no idea that it was a trilogy. I had no idea it was based on books. I just knew there was a big hype around – you know it was being called the new Twilight. And what have you. So I think I was curious as to what this big thing, this… You know, I was very curious. And kind of got the audition for this part of Finnick Odair. I was in Los Angeles. I remember saying ‘Who the hell is this Finnick?’ And I tried to go on Wikipedia and do as much research as possible prior to my first audition, and luckily I was kind of steered in the right direction by the casting director and the director himself. Between the moment that I was sort of offered the part and I was kind of trying to work out the smaller details as the contracts and what have you, I read the books and I read them in five days. Couldn’t quite help but turn the page and keep reading, you know, you can’t just put it down.

FR: He was my favorite character, I feel he has the biggest arc and his development is brilliant. Was he one of yours? Did he stand out for you when you were reading it? You got a good part?
SC: I mean, for me, again, like, I was kind of – yeah he definitely stuck out somewhat. But for all the wrong reasons. Very selfishly, that was the only character I really cared about. No, but the great thing about the books, um, that Suzanne Collins kind of created great arcs to each and every character. No matter, you know, from Katniss all the way down to her sister, her mother. You know each character kinda goes on a journey and I think that’s what’s so perfect about the books themselves.

FR: On the subject of Finnick, he’s quite a significant character in the story and he’s won. All the fans of the original literature are going to have a mental picture of him in their minds. You’re gonna have this well established picture in people’s minds of what Finnick should be. How do you approach portraying a character like that with such expectations already there?
SC: I mean, I have to say the pressure is on. I mean, I’m a member of Twitter and, you know, specially when it was first announced there was a huge backlash. Some positive and some very negative, you know, people were like saying they want to kill themselves, that I wasn’t anywhere near a good looking Finnick. Everyone has their own perception of what a good-looking person is. And basically, all I can do is do my best and you know it’s – you have to kinda try not reading the bad press or whatever, you know? You have to just kinda keep focusing and, you know, working hard and the moment you kind of channel all that out – you know, I  just have fun really and it was hard work, it was definitely, definitely hard work, you know. I was eating chicken and asparagus twice every day, not including all the other meals I was forced to have each day and, you know, working out three times a day. I didn’t really have a life, but when I was on set you know, there was a great between the cast and the crew, you know it’s like when you’re in the middle of Hawaii – you don’t really care of what other people think. I enjoyed the moment while I was in the moment. But now, you know, I’m still reading negative feedback but I mean, what can I do? I can’t change my face.

FR: Also when you were cast as Finnick, you read the books, knowing that was going to be your part. Did you talk to the author at all for any sort of further advice on how she saw the character? Did you talk to her or the director before you hit the set?
SC: There was definitely a conversation that I had with the director. He was one of the first people I met when I first arrived in America. We had a sit-down, we talked through the script, through the novels and about the previous film. I knew that he wasn’t the director on that but we talked about the flaws and ways of improving or developing the characters’ arc. And obviously, the unfortunate thing about a film version is that they are trying to make it accessible to a younger audience. There are certain aspects you can’t include, one being, Finnick Odair wearing just the net, not covering his crotch – that was something that we couldn’t, unfortunately, include but you know, I’m scantily clad. Hopefully people will still be happy. It was quite, kind of – being able to have this kind of discussion with the director and with other cast members as well, you know, talking about how our character arc together and journey that we all go on. You know, it’s invaluable, really – you have to kind of really take that and use that and make the most of it.

FR: Was there a discussion about your accent, at all?
SC: Yeah, I mean. From the beginning I knew that I was gonna have to be doing an American accent. It’s okay. I’ve left Norwich now, I’m all cool. I have to work on it.

FR: It’s a conscious choice, isn’t it? I mean it’s quite difficult to do constantly, I imagine.
SC: Yeah, it’s – but when I was on set, there was obviously times that knowing that I would, you know, speak a lot, I would kind of try and keep the accent going when they say ‘Cut’, you know to kind of keep it in my brain. But I was also ’cause I was surrounded by Americans, that it was a lot easier to kinda come by. It wasn’t too much of an issue, I don’t think . There was a couple of moments that the director would say ‘Sam – you said that completely wrong’ ‘Oh God, sorry!’ But then, you know, that’s something that I can do in post-production and we can re-record things. Not really a big deal.

FR: We spoke about – ’cause we had a Films of the Year podcast over Christmas and I think we all loved The Hunger Games. But one thing we commented on was the very serious tone of the subject matter and what I always liked about this film was that it was very aware of its subject matter, it was very delicate, very aware of where the audience will be, mentally. When, on set, you were filming Catching Fire, is there a same sort of awareness, I mean is everyone sort of heightened to the point that they know the subject matter is delicate and they kind of have to watch or is it kind of a sort of lively, happy-go-lucky kind of place, trying to gauge the sort of the vibe that might be in or around the place during the filming of it?
SC: I’d love to say that we all took it very seriously, we were very professional – and we are, you know, when we have to be, when we need to be. When they say ‘Action’ we’re all switched on. Everyone’s at positions, everyone’s doing the right thing. However, you know, the moment they say ‘Cut’, like the in-between takes, that time we spend kinda being very mischievous, like all of us were super hyper. It was for the director to kind of take that on board. I do not envy him. As a collective, we were a nightmare but individually, I think, we were all good. But no, I mean, the subject  matter is something that I personally loved. You know, I’m surprised that it kind of touched base with so many teenagers. You know it’s one of those things – it’s about kids killing each other. And you know, the books are a lot more gruesome as opposed in the first film. But they have to make it accessible to that young audience, so it’s tough. It really is tough. Kind of make the most of  what they have, what they can have.

FR: You talked a little bit about your co-stars and working with some of the biggest actors in the business. Philip Seymour Hoffman – I mean, he’s in Catching Fire. Does that kinda intimidate – that must intimidate you. You just walk on the set with these – just incredible people. Does it freak you out?
SC: It does. You can’t help but let it, you know – it’s one of those things that go through you, it goes straight through you. I mean, Stanley Tucci, Woody Harrelson, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Even Jennifer Lawrence is just, you know, one golden girl and what have you. I have been lucky enough to be surrounded by some of the best actors that are living. You know, from Johnny Depp, Penelope Cruz to Ian McShane. It’s ridiculous the list of names that I have worked with. But you know, I know I’m very, very lucky to be in the situation that I am. Some of my friends in drama school haven’t worked since drama school, and you know, you kind of just have to put it down to luck really.

FR: I’ve heard a rumor that whilst you were filming Snow White, you had an incident with your horse where it kinda took off on you and Chris Hemsworth came to the rescue. Now, you’ve been using a trident for the role of Finnick. So have there been any kind of close calls or horror stories whilst you’ve been filming?
SC: There really have. This is actually questionable how much I can talk about ’cause I was specifically asked not to mention some of the accidents that happened there. Let’s just say I’m a very, very clumsy person. There was fall after fall after fall – I mean we basically, me and Francis, the director,  we were laughing that there will be a whole DVD extra, you know, a whole DVD on its own for the blooper reel just for me. Because every time he’d say ‘Action’, you know just before he’d let the fire, I’d slip over or I’d fall – even when I’m standing still, I’d manage to fall over so um, there were plenty of accidents. My dad would probably tell you on the private.

You can hear the full interview here.
{hunger-games.net}

Thanks again for joining me this week, Tributes! See you next Thursday and may the odds be ever in your favor!